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MMRF » Michelson Prizes for Human Immunology and Vaccine Research [HVP] » Dr. Ansuman Satpathy: Michelson Prize 2018 for Human Immunology and Vaccine Research

Dr. Ansuman Satpathy | 2018 Winner of Michelson Prize for Human Immunology and Vaccine Research [2018-06-27. HVP/MMRF]

Dr. Ansuman Satpathy: 2018 Recipient — Michelson Prize for Human Immunology and Vaccine Research.

Context

The Michelson Prizes for Human Immunology and Vaccine Research

On June 19th, 2018, Dr. Ansuman Satpathy of Stanford University School of Medicine (United States) was announced as one of the three recipients of the inaugural Michelson Prizes for Human Immunology and Vaccine Research.

Those awards, funded by the Michelson Medical Research Foundation, under the helm of Dr. Gary K. Michelson, and cojointly organized with the Human Vaccines Project, a non profit organization founded by Dr. Wayne Koff, are part of a $20 million initiative whose goal is to significantly advance the development of future vaccines and therapies against major global diseases by supporting young investigators, under the age of 35, who will apply innovative research concepts and disruptive technologies.

Dr. Satpathy, alongside the two other award’s first recipients, was chosen among a global competition that included over a hundred applications spanning 12 countries. Each of the three 2018 Michelson prize winners were awarded a $150,000 Prize to fund specific aspects of their research.

The Michelson Prize for Human Immunology and Vaccine Research will provide greater resources for Dr. Satpathy to pursue advancements in 3D and single-cell epigenetic technologies, strengthening the future human immunology and vaccine research.

Through his research, Dr. Satpathy is focused on developing new genome sequencing technologies in order to study human immunology cells in patients.

A week later, on Thursday, June 27, 2018, Dr. Satpathy visited the USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience, located at the University of Southern California, for the 1st Annual Conference on the Future of Vaccine Development.

It’s during this symposium that Dr. Satpathy addressed his fellow scientists with a presentation devoted to “3D and Sincle-Cell Epigenome Technologies for Precision Immune Profiling”. As he was about to be awarded the 2018 Michelson Prize during the Symposium closing dinner, the accompanying tribute video was projected.

Transcript

Ansuman Satpathy: Our work is focused on developing new genome sequencing technologies to study immune cells in patients. And in particular, we’re focused on understanding the non-protein coding DNA of the genome and how the molecular switches in those areas of DNA impact the expression of genes. So, the Michelson prize will allow us to move into a new area of research for us, that of vaccinology, and use our genome-sequencing tools that we’ve developed to study T cells in patients receiving vaccines, and to understand why some patients respond well and some patients don’t respond well to the same vaccine.

I’m really inspired by science that takes advantage of the strengths of many different fields of scientific investigation. For example, science that combines expertise from fields of genomics, or computer science, or engineering to really pursue questions that are directly relevant to patient care and patient disease.

My post-doctoral mentor is Dr. Howard Chang, who is an expert in genomics and developing genomic technologies. Howard has really been instrumental in my development as a scientist, one, because he’s allowed me to go into this new area of genomics for me. So, I was trained as a basic immunologist, and Howard really allowed me to come into the lab and pursue new ideas that I didn’t have prior expertise in.

Howard Chang: Dr. Satpathy and I began working together really almost by coincidence. Dr. Satpathy was interviewing for a residency position at Stanford, and he contacted me to meet to talk about research in my group. We both found our backgrounds match pretty well and we have a common interest, and that’s how we started working together.

The value and impact of Dr. Satpathy’s work is really in bringing molecular insight to the phenomenon of the immune response, and also efforts to program immune response towards therapeutic ads, for example, for vaccination. We know a lot of different important things that change the immune system, but we don’t know why. Dr. Satpathy’s research allows us to look into individual cells that form the basis of immune memory.

I believe the Michelson prize will have a great impact on Dr. Satpathy’s work. It’s very challenging for a young investigator to get their first award and establish an independent claim in recognition in the field. So, the Michelson prize comes at a really important junction in his career, to allow him to really run with his most creative ideas and take some bigger risks.

Press Excerpt

Michelson Prize Awards $450,000 to Young Scientists Advancing Immunology and Vaccine Research

The Michelson Medical Research Foundation and the Human Vaccines Project award three recipients with inaugural Michelson Prizes for Human Immunology and Vaccine Research

Dr. Ansuman Satpathy, an instructor in pathology at Stanford University School of Medicine, is focused on combining disciplines of genomics and human immunology. His research will identify key gene regulatory mechanisms that trigger protective immunity following vaccination using novel epigenomic sequencing technologies applied directly to patient samples. The Prize will allow him to greatly accelerate his work, advancing both 3D and single-cell epigenetic technologies to human immunology and vaccine research.

Source
Quotes
Dr. Ansuman Satpathy

I’m really inspired by science that takes advantage of the strengths of many different fields of scientific investigation. (…) Science that combines expertise from fields of genomics, or computer science, or engineering to really pursue questions that are directly relevant to patient care and patient disease.

Dr. Howard Chang

We know a lot of different important things that change the immune system, but we don’t know why. Dr. Satpathy’s research allows us to look into individual cells that form the basis of immune memory.

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