IGF-1 Link: CONSORT diagram of 102 contacted subjects of which 100 were enrolled into the study two arms. 50 made it to the finish line. (Credit: Science Translational Medicine)

IGF-1 Link: CONSORT diagram of 102 contacted subjects of which 100 were enrolled into the study two arms. 50 made it to the finish line. (Credit: Science Translational Medicine)

Prolonged fasting is difficult to implement in human subjects and may exacerbate preexisting nutritional deficiencies, making it not feasible and/or safe for children, the elderly, frail individuals, and even most of the healthy adults.

The Fasting Mimicking Diet (FMD)is designed to achieve effects similar to those caused by fasting on IGF-1, insulin-like growth factor–binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1), glucose, and ketone bodies. To prevent nutrient
deficiency, this FMD provided between 3000 and 4600 kJ per day, as well as high micronutrient nourishment, to each human subject.

Fig. 1. Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) diagram of 102 contacted subjects of which 100 were enrolled into the study two arms.

Arm 1 (n = 48), the “control” group, maintained their normal caloric intake for a 3-month monitoring period. Data were collected at enrollment and again after 3 months.

Arm 2 (n = 52) participants started the FMD after randomization. The FMD is provided for 5 days per month for three consecutive cycles. Data were collected at enrollment, at the completion of the first FMD cycle but before resuming normal dietary intake, and also on average 5 days after subjects resumed their normal diet after the final FMD cycle.

After the initial 3-month period, subjects in arm 1 also started the FMD. An optional follow-up visit in the clinic for analysis was offered to all participants about 3 months after the completion of the third FMD cycle.

(Credit: Science Translational Medicine)