...Changing The World

Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative [Sabin].

Project Description

The Sabin Product Development Partnership (PDP) is collaborating with the Michelson Medical Research Foundation [MMRF] to develop new, low-cost vaccines aimed at preventing diseases such as human hookworm, schistosomiasis and intestinal helminth infections. Those vaccines, with little commercial appeal as the diseases targeted primarily affect the world’s poorest populations, will impact the lives of more than one billion people worldwide once released.
Grantee Year Issue Program
Beneficiaries Sabin Vaccine Institute
2012 Schistosomiasis Vaccine Schistosomiasis Vaccine Initiative
2013 Multivalent Anthelminthic Vaccine Research & Development
2014 Human Hookworm Vaccine Michelson Neglected Disease Initiative
2014 Human Hookworm Vaccine Contribution of Support for
The Discovery of Antigens [4 Year Pledge]
Grantee Beneficiaries Sabin Vaccine Institute
Year Issue Program
2012 Schistosomiasis Vaccine Schistosomiasis Vaccine Initiative
2013 Multivalent Anthelminthic Vaccine Research & Development
2014 Human Hookworm Vaccine Michelson Neglected Disease Initiative
2014 Human Hookworm Vaccine Contribution of Support for
The Discovery of Antigens [4 Year Pledge]
Grantee Beneficiaries Sabin Vaccine Institute
Year Issue Program
2012 Schistosomiasis Vaccine Schistosomiasis Vaccine Initiative
2013 Multivalent Anthelminthic Vaccine Research & Development
2014 Human Hookworm Vaccine Michelson Neglected Disease Initiative
2014 Human Hookworm Vaccine Contribution of Support for
The Discovery of Antigens [4 Year Pledge]
Grantee Beneficiaries Sabin Vaccine Institute
Year Issue Program
2012 Schistosomiasis Vaccine Schistosomiasis Vaccine Initiative
2013 Multivalent Anthelminthic Vaccine Research & Development
2014 Human Hookworm Vaccine Michelson Neglected Disease Initiative
2014 Human Hookworm Vaccine Contribution of Support for
The Discovery of Antigens [4 Year Pledge]

With the generous help of more than $5 million in financial support from Dr. Gary K. Michelson and his wife Alya Michelson of the Michelson Medical Research Foundation [MMRF], the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (Sabin PDP) focuses on developing safe, effective and low-cost vaccines that can prevent human suffering caused by infectious and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative supports a number of Sabin PDP activities and helps advance an innovative model that relies on private, academic, and public institutions around the world to collaborate for preclinical development, vaccine manufacturing and clinical testing. These include:

Human Hookworm Vaccine Discovery Program

The Human Hookworm Vaccine, under development by the Sabin PDP, is currently comprised of the recombinant antigens Na-GST-1 and Na-APR-1 now in clinical testing in the U.S., Brazil and Gabon. There is the potential that the vaccine could be enhanced by using additional or alternative recombinant antigens, and the Human Hookworm Vaccine Discovery program is advancing research and development to identify, express and evaluate new candidate vaccine antigens for human hookworm.

Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 1-Human Hookworm Vaccine
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 1-Human Hookworm Vaccine
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 1-Human Hookworm Vaccine
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 1-Human Hookworm Vaccine

The Sabin Vaccine Institute PDP works on developing vaccines for the more than 700 million people suffering from hookworm in the world today. Because hookworm affects only the world’s poorest people, Sabin PDP’s approach is filling an important market gap by developing an inexpensive vaccine with little or no traditional market value.

Originally established in 2000 with funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Sabin PDP (formerly the Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative) partners with private, academic and public institutions in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), Australia, the United States and Europe to collaborate on preclinical studies, vaccine manufacturing and clinical testing. Sabin PDP is the first and only PDP in the world developing a vaccine for human hookworm infection.

 

Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 2-Project Status
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 2-Project Status
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 2-Project Status
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 2-Project Status

The Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative (HHVI) has identified and produced several candidates for potential use as a vaccine. HHVI is focused on developing and testing a vaccine to prevent moderate to severe hookworm infection in children younger than 10 years old living in endemic areas. The goal is to reduce the anemia, delayed physical growth and impaired cognitive development caused by hookworm infection. There currently are two lead candidate antigens being developed to stimulate the human immune system to produce antibodies that inhibit parasite blood feeding:

  • Na-GST-1: Phase 1 clinical testing of the Na-GST-1 hookworm vaccine began in January 2012. Currently, clinical trials are being carried out in the U.S., Brazil and Gabon.
  • Na-APR-1: Na-APR-1 has also shown protection against adult hookworm in preclinical studies. Clinical testing began in September 2013.

Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 3-History
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine-3
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 3-History
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 3-History

The suffering caused by hookworm is not well known in the developed world but in many countries it is all too prevalent. More than 700 million people are infected with hookworm. The largest number of cases occur in impoverished areas of Sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, China and Latin America. Globally, approximately 3.2 billion people are at risk for hookworm infection.

With financial support from our partners including the Michelson Medical Research Foundation, the Sabin PDP is developing a vaccine against hookworm. A vaccine could provide a sustainable, effective means for controlling hookworm infection and protect the world’s poor from this harmful infection.

 

Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 4-About Hookworm
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 4-About Hookworm
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 4-About Hookworm
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Hookworm Vaccine: 4-About Hookworm

Hookworm is an intestinal parasite most commonly found in tropical and sub-tropical climates of Africa, Asia and Latin America.

One of three members of a family of parasites known as the soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), hookworms are half-inch long worms that attach themselves to the intestinal wall and feed on human blood.

Left untreated, hookworm causes severe intestinal blood loss leading to iron-deficiency anemia and protein malnutrition, particularly in pregnant women and children. Chronic hookworm infection in children contributes to physical and intellectual impairment, learning difficulties and poor school performance.

 

Pan-Anthelminthic Vaccine Discovery Program

The Sabin PDP is working to develop a pan-anthelminthic vaccine targeting three major intestinal helminth infections – ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infection – which cause the highest disease burden of NTDs. This discovery program leverages the Sabin PDP’s programmatic and technical infrastructure to carry out discovery, preclinical evaluation, and early feasibility studies of ascaris and trichuris candidate antigens. Ultimately, antigens selected for development could be incorporated into the hookworm and schistosomiasis vaccines already under development by the Sabin PDP.

Schistosomiasis Vaccine Initiative

Thanks to the support of the Michelson Medical Research Foundation and others, the Sabin PDP has completed discovery, product development, good manufacturing practice (GMP) manufacture and toxicology testing for a schistosomiasis vaccine. Schistosomiasis is a deadly disease affecting more than 200 million people worldwide that can result in chronic kidney disease, liver, and bladder cancers, and increased risk of HIV transmission in women. The Sabin PDP initiated Phase I clinical testing of the Sm-TSP-2 antigen in 2015.

Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 1-Peter J. Hotez
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 1-Peter J. Hotez
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 1-Peter J. Hotez
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 1-Peter J. Hotez

Schistosomiasis afflicts over 200 million people around the globe and is the deadliest disease among the seven most prevalent NTDs, killing an estimated 280,000 people annually.

Thanks to private donations from Mr. Morton Hyman, Dr. Gary K. Michelson, Texas Children’s Hospital and the Blavatnik Family Foundation, the Schistosomiasis Vaccine Initiative (SVI) utilizes and leverages the Sabin Vaccine Institute PDP’s existing programmatic and technical infrastructure to produce and evaluate a schistosomiasis vaccine.

 

 

 

Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 2-Project Status
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 2-Project Status
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 2-Project Status
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 2-Project Status

In collaboration with researchers at the James Cook University and The George Washington University, a promising new antigen, Sm-TSP-2 (Schistosoma mansoni Tetraspanin-2), was selected for development as a schistosomiasis vaccine.

At Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, Sabin and its partners developed the process for manufacture of the vaccine under cGMP, and was followed by technology transfer to Sabin’s manufacturing partner, Aeras.

Following final lot release, a toxicology study and subsequent regulatory filing for the vaccine took place in 2013 with Phase I clinical testing of the Sm-TSP-2 antigen scheduled for 2015.

 

Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 3-History
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 3-History
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 3-History
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 3-History

The Schistosomiasis Vaccine Initiative was launched in 2008 through funding from Mr. Morton Hyman and the Blavatnik Family Foundation.

In collaboration with researchers at James Cook University and The George Washington University, a promising antigen, Sm-TSP-2, was selected for development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 4: About Schistosomiasis
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 4: About Schistosomiasis
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 4: About Schistosomiasis
Michelson Neglected Disease Vaccine Initiative; Schistosomiasis Vaccine: 4: About Schistosomiasis

Schistosomiasis is a parasite carried by snails and transmitted through contact with contaminated fresh water sources such as lakes, ponds, rivers and dams. Once inside the body, schistosomiasis larvae develop into adult worms which can live inside the blood vessels for years causing severe blood loss, anemia, malnutrition as well as long-term infections such as kidney, spleen and liver damage and bladder cancer. Re-infection with contaminated water sources, particularly for children who wade or play in water and women conducting domestic chores, is a major concern in endemic areas of Africa, where chronic schistosomiasis infections are the primary culprit for anemia, impaired growth and poor school performance in children. Pregnant and lactating women infected with schistosomiasis, generally not considered candidates for treatment with the current drug therapies available, often develop severe anemia and are at an increased risk of developing kidney damage, bladder cancer or meet maternal death.

Dr. Gary K. Michelson

“I felt compelled to support efforts to develop a vaccine against the four most devastating parasitic worm infections because more than one billion innocent people, many of them small children, are unnecessarily plagued by these neglected diseases,” explains Dr. Gary K. Michelson. “I hope that rigorous research, studies and testing conducted by the Sabin PDP, along with additional investments, will eventually lead to meaningful discoveries.”

Dr. Gary K. Michelson

Dr. Gary K. Michelson

“I felt compelled to support efforts to develop a vaccine against the four most devastating parasitic worm infections because more than one billion innocent people, many of them small children, are unnecessarily plagued by these neglected diseases,” explains Dr. Gary K. Michelson. “I hope that rigorous research, studies and testing conducted by the Sabin PDP, along with additional investments, will eventually lead to meaningful discoveries.”

Dr. Gary K. Michelson

Dr. Gary K. Michelson

“I felt compelled to support efforts to develop a vaccine against the four most devastating parasitic worm infections because more than one billion innocent people, many of them small children, are unnecessarily plagued by these neglected diseases,” explains Dr. Gary K. Michelson. “I hope that rigorous research, studies and testing conducted by the Sabin PDP, along with additional investments, will eventually lead to meaningful discoveries.

Dr. Gary K. Michelson

Dr. Gary K. Michelson

“I felt compelled to support efforts to develop a vaccine against the four most devastating parasitic worm infections because more than one billion innocent people, many of them small children, are unnecessarily plagued by these neglected diseases,” explains Dr. Gary K. Michelson. “I hope that rigorous research, studies and testing conducted by the Sabin PDP, along with additional investments, will eventually lead to meaningful discoveries.”

Dr. Gary K. Michelson

Sabin Vaccine Institute
Sabin Vaccine Institute
Sabin Vaccine Institute
Sabin Vaccine Institute

The Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin) is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization of scientists, researchers, and advocates dedicated to reducing needless human suffering from vaccine-preventable and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Since its founding in 1993, Sabin has been at the forefront of global efforts to prevent and eliminate infectious and neglected tropical diseases.

To achieve this mission, Sabin develops new vaccines, advocates for increased use of existing vaccines and promotes expanded access to affordable medical treatments.

The Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership is a non-profit research and development model that works to address diseases that have no available vaccine. Working together with a network of global partners, Sabin is spearheading research and development projects that will benefit hundreds of millions of people suffering from diseases including hookworm, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, ascariasis, trichuriasis, Chagas disease and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

Sabin’s Vaccine Advocacy and Education programs work with leading international experts and organizations to promote awareness of infectious diseases and the immunizations necessary to combat them. By educating leaders from national governments, the private sector, media and civil society organizations on the value of immunization and the burden of disease, and by encouraging collaboration among all development partners on vaccine issues, Sabin works to improve global awareness, access, policy and action.

The Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases, an advocacy initiative of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, works to raise the awareness, political will and funding necessary to control and eliminate the seven most common neglected tropical diseases. The Global Network works to raise awareness that for only 50 cents per person annually, a packet of pills can be administered to treat all seven of the most common NTDs.

Sabin was founded on the legacy and global vision of one of medicine’s most pre-eminent scientific figures, Dr. Albert B. Sabin, who is best known for developing the oral live virus polio vaccine. Dr. Sabin not only dedicated his entire professional career to groundbreaking medical advancements to reduce human suffering, he also waged a tireless campaign against the health inequities of poverty.

Through a comprehensive approach that relies on scientific innovation, as well as the nuances of advocacy, communications and partnership cultivation, Sabin carries this mission forward.

Peter Hotez, MD, Ph.D and Maria Elena Bottazzi, Ph.D are leading product development partnership efforts at the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development. They are also Dean and Associate Dean, respectively of the National School of Tropical Medicine at BCM.
Peter Hotez, MD, Ph.D and Maria Elena Bottazzi, Ph.D are leading product development partnership efforts at the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development. They are also Dean and Associate Dean, respectively of the National School of Tropical Medicine at BCM.
Peter Hotez, MD, Ph.D and Maria Elena Bottazzi, Ph.D are leading product development partnership efforts at the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development. They are also Dean and Associate Dean, respectively of the National School of Tropical Medicine at BCM.
Peter Hotez, MD, Ph.D and Maria Elena Bottazzi, Ph.D are leading product development partnership efforts at the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development. They are also Dean and Associate Dean, respectively of the National School of Tropical Medicine at BCM.

Peter Hotez, MD, Ph.D and Maria Elena Bottazzi, Ph.D are leading product development partnership efforts at the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development. They are also Dean and Associate Dean, respectively of the National School of Tropical Medicine at BCM.

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